Land of the Brave

George Calvert

George Calvert "Baron Baltimore"

George Calvert "Baron Baltimore"

Short Biography about George Calvert, Lord Baltimore
This article contains a short biography and fast facts and information about the early American colonist, George Calvert, Lord Baltimore. Who was George Calvert and why was he famous?George Calvert, Lord Baltimore was famous and recognized as the founder and patron of the Maryland Colony. George Calvert was at first interested in the colonisation of the New World for commercial reasons but later aspired to create a refuge in America for English Catholics. George Calvert was a member of the English Parliament, served as Secretary of State and Privy Counselor for King James I.

He was conferred the title of Baron of Baltimore and sponsored a small colony at Ferryland in his Province of Avalon in Newfoundland. King Charles I agreed to his petition for a colonial grant but Calvert died before the charter for Maryland was officially granted on June 20, 1632.

Facts about George Calvert, Lord Baltimore
The following facts about George Calvert, Lord Baltimore, provide interesting facts and an overview and description of the life and times and his involvement in the early colonization of America and the Maryland Colony.

Fact 1: George Calvert, Lord Baltimore, was famous as the founder of the Maryland Colony and his efforts to create a refuge in America for English Catholics

Fact 2: When was George Calvert born? He was born in 1579

Fact 3: Where was George Calvert born? He was born in Catterick, North Yorkshire, England

Fact 4: The parents of George Calvert were Leonard and Alicia Calvert. His father was a member of the landed gentry and owned a small estate in Kiplin, Catterick, North Yorkshire where George was born and raised as a Protestant

Fact 5: George Calvert received an excellent education and attended Trinity College, Oxford, had a gift for languages and went on to study law.

Fact 6:
In 1603 he undertook work for Sir Robert Cecil, the chief minister of Queen Elizabeth I, that required travel to Europe and became recognised at court as a specialist in foreign affairs

Fact 7: In November 1604, he married Anne Mayne in a Protestant ceremony at St Peterís, Cornhill in London

Fact 8: In 1610 and 1611, George Calvert undertook missions to Europe on behalf of King James I of England

Fact 9: In 1613, King James I commissioned Calvert to investigate Catholic grievances in Ireland

Fact 10: George Calvert was knighted in 1617 for his services to the king

Fact 11: He became a member of the English Parliament in 1621 and served as Secretary of State and Privy Counselor to King James I

Fact 12: In 1620 he sponsored a small colony at Ferryland in his Province of Avalon, Newfoundland

Fact 13: In February 1624 George Calvert resigned his political post and let it be publicly known that he had converted to Catholicism

Fact 14: In 1625 George Calvert was conferred with the title of Baron of Baltimore and became known as Lord Baltimore

Fact 15: George Calvert, Lord Baltimore visited his American lands with his son in 1627 and 1629 but, concerned about the ability to live in such a harsh climate, he decided to try to obtain lands in a warmer climate. He aspired to create a refuge in North America for English Catholics.

Fact 16: King Charles I agreed to his petition for a large colonial grant and granted lands located north of the Potomac River on either side of the Chesapeake Bay

Fact 17: In 1632 Lord Baltimore, suffering ill health, sent his son Leonard Calvert, together with 300 Catholic settlers back to America.

Fact 18: Lord Baltimore died in his lodgings at Lincoln's Inn Fields, London on 15 April 1632

Fact 19: The charter for Maryland was officially granted five weeks after his death on June 20, 1632

Fact 20: Maryland became a refuge for Catholic settlers, as George Calvert had hoped and thousands of British Catholics emigrated to Maryland.

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Updated 2018-01-01

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