Land of the Brave

Boston Port Act

Colonial America - Land of the Brave


Definition of the Boston Port Act

The Meaning and Definition of the Boston Port Act: The Boston Port Act was passed by the Parliament of Great Britain March 31, 1774. The Boston Port Act was designed to punish the inhabitants of Boston, Massachusetts for the incident that would become known as the Boston Tea Party.

The Port Actwas one of a series of British Laws referred to as the passed by the Parliament of Great Britain 1774.

The Boston Port Act 1774
The Boston Port Act was:

"An act to discontinue, in such manner, and for or such time as are therein mentioned, the landing and discharging, lading or shipping, of goods, wares, and merchandise, at the town, and within the harbour, of Boston, in the province of Massachusetts Bay, in North America."

The Boston Port Act closed the port of Boston so tightly that the colonists could not bring hay from Charlestown to give to their starving horses.

Purpose of Boston Port Act of 1774
The Boston Port Act was to close the port until the tea that had been destroyed at the Boston Tea Party and that payments were made to the East India Company paid for the lost tea and that payments were made to the king for the lost taxes. Only food and firewood were permitted into the port.

Events leading up to the Boston Port Act 1774
The events that led to the passing of the Intolerable Acts, including the Boston Port Act, were primarily the:

The which occurred on March 5, 1770
The of 1773
The that occurred on December 16, 1773

The Sons of Liberty, a secret, underground organization formed following the 1765 Stamp Act, were Patriots who agitated and protested against British rule in the colonies. The Boston Port Act was one of the series of reprisals for the actions taken by the patriots. Read the .

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